Thoughts on Twitter & social networking
Hypocrisy of #Japan ‘non-smoking law’

1) ppl smoke 1-2m downwind from any store entrance/bus/train stop
2) pedestrians must pass by the smokers near all convenience stores
3) drivers smoke out of the windows on pedestrians
4) open smoking areas outdoors in shopping centers
5) unpartitioned smoking sections in all family restaurants
6) smoking bicyclists speeding on sidewalks
7) bus drivers smoking out of bus window during breaks contaminating the bus

And the Biggest Hypocrisy of all - No penalties enforced due to the ambiguity of jurisdiction

Okutama, Japan

fabulousflowers10:

Water lily

fabulousflowers10:

Water lily

Commuting excitement

literaryescapades:

So many weirdoes on city trains
And it is worse on days when it rains
Consider themselves to be very special
When all they need - talk to mental professional 

Some are too loud with touch of hysteric
Some are hygienically almost barbaric 
Others appallingly rude and malicious
Making experience overly-“precious”

#Tokyo #summer retreat (very north/west) #Okutama

#Tokyo #summer retreat (very north/west) #Okutama

#Summer #skies

#Summer #skies

Matcha latte #Tokyo style

Matcha latte #Tokyo style

Commuting excitement

literaryescapades:

So many weirdoes on city trains
And it is worse on days when it rains
Consider themselves to be very special
When all they need - talk to mental professional 

Some are too loud with touch of hysteric
Some are hygienically almost barbaric 
Others appallingly rude and malicious
Making experience overly-“precious”

Pension: ‘legal’ ponzi scheme:

Japan government is currently trying to enroll more people in the pension scheme, even those who physically won’t be able to contribute (what with the ¥50000 monthly income and all).

The Big Question is: would there be any money left for pensions in 20~30 years (or even 10) if governments in all developed countries are struggling to pay them out now?
It feels more like prolonging rather than a solution, isn’t it?

Pension schemes are actually working the same way as ponzi , they can only pay out if enough new ‘subscribers’ are enrolled. That’s why authorities are so desperate to ‘find’ them anywhere they can and legislative power helps ‘round up’ the rest who for various reasons isn’t contributing.
The pension system was introduced based on baby-booming expectations and rising economy in 50-60s. The myth of ever-expanding population that would shoulder the burden of paying in was out of the window long time ago, at least the in early 80s.

The system is doomed and people ‘in charge’ have known it for a long enough while.
Declining economy has made it harder for private entities to share pension costs for their employees, that led to partial restructuring, contract condition changes, introduction of more part-time position, increase in pension fees and reduction of the benefits.
Just compare benefits of the same status company employee that has retired in 1980s, 90s and now. With exact same input (although, with smaller savings due to decades of deflation) the difference is staggering.

Meanwhile public sector employees don’t seem to experience any of the uncomfortable changes in economic climate. They can stilk combine 2 pensions: public (payed largely by tax payers) and private (from amakudari position after their retirement from public sector and transition to private).

Constantly advancing the retirement age is another trick based on the scientifically unfound projected life span and has no ground in terms of supporting people’s employment until the ever-advancing age of pension eligibility, except few menial low-paid jobs that should’ve been done using all the available technologies at least a decade ago.
The truth is: no matter how much people contribute right now - pension benefits they will possibly receive in the future are constantly shrinking even as we speak. Public employees of course are safe and sound, at least for now.

The biggest Question of all is: why public still tolerates this oversized public sector that has the biggest pay/benefits than any private industry, second only to financial. People who introduced such “sound”economic policies that brought about current economic instability are rewarded for their ‘outstanding’ work with higher salaries, pension benefits and job stability.
And now they are busy cooking up enother schemes to prolong their comfy existence for as long as it’s possible.

The Question is: why is this even legal?

Tokyo train saga

Trains are running on timeless rails
Slow in the mornings like tedious snails
Packed in the evenings with leftover crowd
Pushing and shoving and mostly loud

Poking umbrellas, newspapers and comics
Torturous seats that defy ergonomics
Various odors mixed up in the air
Making this trip everyday’s nightmare.